Did you grow up thinking that animal flesh was the only viable source of protein? Lots of us did—but now we know it was all a lie.

There’s protein in just about everything: A freaking bagel has 10 grams of protein. Google it—right now. Yep, you’d have to eat a weird diet of applesauce and jelly beans to avoid getting enough protein.

Veggies, Beans, and Lentils

Not only do vegetables, beans, and lentils have tons of protein in them, they’re also superior to animal-based protein sources. Who needs saturated fat, cholesterol, anti-biotics, hormones, feces, and bad juju when you can eat PLANTS loaded with antioxidants, phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals, nutrients, and good vibes?

These foods not only don’t increase your risk of developing cancer and disease, as meat does, but actually lower it.

Avocado – 4 grams of protein per cup

Loaded with  vitamins C, E, K, and B6 as well as riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and potassium

Broccoli – 4 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of calcium, vitamin C, fiber, and B vitamins

Asparagus – 5 grams of protein per roasted ounce

Great source of B vitamins and folate

Spinach – 5 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of vitamins A, C, E, K, and B6 as well as niacin, zinc, fiber, thiamine, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, and manganese

Artichokes – 8 grams of protein per cup

Great source of vitamin C, fiber, potassium, and magnesium

Green Peas – 9 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and several B vitamins as well as fiber, thiamine, folate, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and K

Edamame – 20 grams per cup

Great source of vitamin K1, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, iron, copper, and manganese

Pinto Beans – 12 grams of protein per cup

Great source of molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, manganese, phosphorus, vitamins B12 and B6, magnesium, potassium, and iron

Kidney Beans – 13 grams of protein per cup

Great source of calcium, vitamin C, fiber, and B vitamins

Black Beans – 15 grams of protein per cup

Great source of antioxidants, fiber, folate, copper, manganese, thiamine, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron

Chickpeas – 15 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of fiber, iron, folate, phosphorus, potassium, and manganese

Lentils – 18 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of fiber, thiamine, folate, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and K

Lentil Pasta by Tolerant – 21 grams of protein per 3 ounces

Great source of folate, thiamine, and fiber

Grains, Nuts, and Seeds

Most people have no idea how much protein they’re actually supposed to get in a day (and usually eat way too much), but non-vegans always seem to wonder how vegans get enough protein. *Eye roll*

Here’s the real question: If dead animals are your main protein source, where do you get your riboflavin, niacin, lutein, zinc, phosphorous, thiamine, selenium, magnesium, folate, calcium, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and K—hmm?

Millet – 6 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of niacin, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, potassium, calcium, zinc, and phytochemicals

Amaranth – 7 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of iron, B vitamins, and magnesium

Wild Rice – 7 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of fiber, manganese, magnesium, copper, phosphorus, and B vitamins as well as an excellent source of iron, folate, and potassium

Quinoa – 8 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of fiber, iron, manganese, phosphorus, and magnesium

Ezekiel Bread – 8 grams of protein per two slices

Great source of fiber, folate, beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E

100 Percent Whole Wheat Pasta – 8 grams of protein per cooked cup

Great source of B vitamins and iron

Buckwheat – 24 grams of protein per cup

Great source of antioxidants, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, niacin, zinc, iron, folate, and vitamin B6

Chia Seeds – 5 grams of protein per 2 tablespoons

Great source of calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, boron, niacin, and vitamins B, D and E, and contains 8.7 times the omega-3 fatty acids found in wild Atlantic salmon

Pistachios – 6 grams of protein per ounce

Great source of copper, manganese, thiamine, phosphorus, and vitamin B6

Almonds – 6 grams of protein per ounce

Great source of vitamin E, manganese, biotin, copper, magnesium, molybdenum, riboflavin, and phosphorus

Sunflower Seeds – 6 grams of protein per quarter cup

Great source of manganese, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, folate, niacin, and vitamins E, B1, and B6

Peanut Butter – 7 grams of protein per two tablespoons

Great source of magnesium, potassium, and vitamins B6 and E

Pumpkin Seeds – 8 grams of protein per ounce

Great source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc

Hempseeds – 10 grams of protein per ounce

Great source of magnesium, iron, calcium, zinc, selenium, and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids

Vegan Meats and Dairy Alternatives

Animals aren’t protein sources—they’re our friends. There are so many vegan meats, nondairy milks, and other plant-based foods that are high in protein, mind-blowingly delicious, and so much healthier that you won’t even have time to crave animals’ bodies, eggs, or milk.

Tofu – 20 grams of protein per cup (12 grams in two hard-boiled eggs)

Great source of calcium, manganese, copper, selenium, phosphorus, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin B1

tofu and veggies

Beyond Burger by Beyond Meat – 20 grams of protein per burger (19 grams in a beef burger)

Great source of iron, vitamin C, fiber, and calcium

Sausage by Field Roast – 25 grams of protein per sausage (18 grams in a pork sausage)

Great source of potassium and iron

Seitan – 25 grams of protein per 3.5 ounces (25 grams of protein in a steak)

Great source of selenium

Tempeh – 41 grams of protein per cup (20 grams in a chicken breast)

Great source of probiotics, B vitamins, and minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus

Kite Hill Ricotta Cheese – 3 grams of protein per ounce (3 grams in dairy ricotta)

Great source of vitamin E and potassium

Almond-Milk Plain Yogurt – 6 grams of protein per single-serving container (5 grams in dairy yogurt)

Great source of vitamin D and calcium

Nutritional Yeast – 14 grams of protein per ounce (5.7 grams in parmesan cheese)

Good source of fiber, zinc, magnesium, copper, manganese, and all the B vitamins, including B12

Soy Milk – 8 grams of protein per cup (8 grams in cow’s milk)

Great source of potassium, isoflavones, and vitamins A and B12, and often fortified with calcium and vitamin D

Wowiewowow, that’s so much protein and so many amazing benefits that come with all these delicious, nutritious noms. Everyone should be eating lots of beans, seeds, nuts, and vegetables because these are the foods that give you energy and glowing skin and protect you from disease.

When we’re eating enough of the good stuff, there’s just no room for unhealthy animal proteins in our diet.

Vegan for everyone! Check out peta2’s Guide to Going Vegan.